My mentor was amazing and got back to my extremely quickly when it came to feedback, advice and answering any questions I had.
— Dana, Academic Apprenticeship student
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Aron

Aron will be the main point of contact for all mentors and students over the course of the Academic Apprenticeship.

After qualifying as a sports coach, Aron developed a keen interest in the holistic approach to youth development.  Working across London, he became increasingly aware of the influence of social inequality on opportunities and outcomes.  Having progressed to mentoring students and managing a school services department, Aron was driven by his passion for providing young people with access to sport, positive experiences and inspirational role models.

More recently, Aron has managed the delivery of the National Citizen Service programme, providing support for hard to reach individuals in the process.  He has also been responsible for the delivery of student workshops, promoting the development of transferable skills, in line with improving pathways to higher education.

Aron values mentoring because he believes that positive role models can play a significant part in helping students to open doors for themselves.

He maintains his passion for providing young people with opportunities and is adamant that access to higher education should be one of them.

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Ed

Ed studied Politics, Psychology and Sociology at the University of Cambridge. He is currently studying for a Masters in the Sociology of Education at UCL. He has worked in university outreach and admissions at the University of Cambridge, and currently works for Causeway Education as a Programme Coordinator.  

Ed enjoys mentoring because it provides him with the opportunity to explore students’ areas of interest and help them to hone down their thoughts into precise, detailed arguments.  Eligible for free school meals, Ed was the first person in his family to attend university, and fiercely believes that equality of educational opportunity is a right, not a privilege.  

The mentoring programme was a brilliant experience and opportunity…my mentor was always there when I needed her support. I believe that every student writing their statement should have access to OSCAR
— Zuliat, Academic Apprenticeship student
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Izzy

Izzy studied German and English at UCL and currently works at Causeway Education as a Programmes Assistant. Before joining Causeway Education, she worked as a teaching assistant in a Sixth Form. Izzy has always felt committed to tackling social inequality through education. It was in this role that she decided she wanted to work in the Widening Participation sector and help tackle educational inequality.

Beckie

Beckie has worked as a science teacher for over 10 years and has led various initiatives in schools aimed at narrowing the attainment gap. Her experience also includes several years mentoring students through the UCAS statement writing process. She is passionately committed to helping students realise their true potential.

Having access to OSCAR and an AA mentor helped me start my personal statement during the summer holidays which gave me plenty of time…It was really helpful to get course specific feedback
— Amna, Academic Apprenticeship student
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Simon

Simon started teaching in 1994 after a career in the City and is qualified to teach biology to A level and beyond. Having served 11 years as head of a secondary boarding school he stepped down from headship in 2016 in order to have a second kidney transplant and begin a freelance career in education. His particular interests are widening access, mentoring school leaders and the role of education in strengthening communities.

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Sherelle

Sherelle studied Sociology at the London School of Economics and went on to complete her Masters in Culture and Society.  She has previously worked in Widening Participation departments at LSE and St Mary’s University developing and delivering academic programmes for Key Stage 4 and 5 students, as well as building databases of deprivation data.  Prior to that she worked for I CAN, a children’s communication charity, assisting the Business Development Team on broadening the charities reach.  

Sherelle values being a mentor as it allows her to pass on very simple techniques to help students produce outstanding analysis.  She considers broadening access to higher education a powerful tool in working towards this goal.  During her studies, she became engaged with social activism and grew politically dedicated to alleviating social inequality.

This programme really helped me because I wanted to make a competitive application for Medicine and was able to do so from the help I received. Having support over the summer holidays leading up to UCAS deadline motivated me to do better and I know I did much better than if it had just been myself and sixth form working on it.
— Sulayman, Academic Apprenticeship student